Starters

All recipes featured are our own unless otherwise stated. We love to cook and our inspiration comes from everywhere. We have travelled the world, eaten out in countless places and about to lose count of our literary food based collection. Ingredients are always fresh, we very rarely use processed food, everything is achievable at home if you want it to be.

Please feel free to rate, comment or give feedback on anything you see, cook yourself or just have an opinion on. We won’t bite back, promise.

Prawn and spinach risottoWe do love a risotto, it's pleasurably soothing and relaxing to make and the rich, creamy result is perfect comfort food, all that's required is some patience for stirring, a bowl and a spoon. There is no cheese in this recipe but feel free to indulge and don't be afraid to use extra virgin olive olive when frying the vegetable base, if Italians can use it for cooking them so can you.
Miso pickled mushroomsThis recipe is adapted from a book called 'Ferment pickle dry', I have made these many times, the recipe is very flexible and adaptable and can be made to suit your taste palate. These are as the book states a crossover between Japanese miso-pickling and European vinegar-pickling. You can eat them as an accompaniment to a cocktail, as part of a Asian inspired feast, an addition to salads or whenever you simply want salty, spicy, sweet, acidic umami party in the mouth and don't waste the liquid, it's great to use as a dressing.
Roast celeriac and king oyster mushroom salad with halloumi and walnut pestoSalads aren't just for lazy summer days, enjoy this hearty bold autumnal salad either as a small starter, side or indeed as a stunning vegetarian main. The idea for this ensemble is from dirt candy, a vegetarian cookbook from a vegetarian restaurant in New York. There are a number of elements to building this salad so preparation is key to pulling it all together at the end and you need to be very good at multi tasking so read the instructions first.
Boozy luxurious mushrooms on toastEarthy thyme and oyster mushrooms, combined with sweet marsala and crème fraiche come together for an indulgent treat. I've also added dried morels here but you can easily exchange these for porcini or other dried wild mushrooms or leave them out completely and use all fresh mushrooms, the ingredients here are very flexible, choose your booze and choose your indulgence and away you go.
Oyster mushroom pakorasPakora's are essentially fritters deep fried in oil, they can be made with one vegetable or a mixture so don't be afraid to experiment not only with the vegetable but the spices involved in the batter. This is a small batch of batter, perfect for a starter for two, it can easily be doubled, I've used large oyster mushrooms here but you could use any mushroom, sliced king oyster, portabella and even whole button mushrooms.
Barley and vegetable soupWe love soups in winter and this is a nourishing comforting bowl to warm the soul. Feel free to make it vegetarian by using vegetable stock and make it vegan by using vegan cheese, use beef stock instead of chicken if you have a preference, I'd even go as far as saying use Oxo or Bisto if that's your choice. I've used some basic vegetables here, onions, garlic, carrot and leek so again you can add or swap using whatever veg you have in at the time. NOTE: Prep time doesn't include soaking the barley
Carrot, lentil and miso soupAutumn through to winter always gets us craving for a bowl of soup, miso is an ingredient we have embraced the past few years and always have some in the fridge, it sits happily there for ages and it's very good for you. The inspiration here came from a book called 'Miso Tasty' by Bonnie Chung and it will teach you every thing you need to know about Miso.
Hot and tangy aubergineHot with the chilli and tangy from the tamarind, this is a great quick and easy way to serve up 1 aubergine, perfect for two as part of an Indian feast. As the aubergine brown in the oil it really picks up the flavour of the fennel and nigella seeds, feel free to only use one spice if that's all you have and if you can't find any tamarind paste then you can always substitute with lemon or lime juice
Shami Kebabs – Lamb Kebabs with cinnamonThese are adapted from a beautiful book called 'Tasting India' by Christine Manfield. Traditionally the mixture is kneaded, slapped and pounded against the sides of a bowl to soften and therefore tenderize it before shaping into patties, the food processor here does all that work for such a small amount of paste.